Curriculum Strategy

A Curriculum fit for Purpose

At Glenmere we follow Government statutory guidance through a creative approach in a way that is enjoyable as well as being informative and educational. Our aim is to engage, stimulate and inspire every child by enlivening the content. Educational visits and visitors to school help us to build the character and nature of our curriculum; enabling us to provide real opportunities to reinforce learning, widen horizons, gain and retain knowledge, develop new skills and engage in new experiences. Knowledge and skills are taught in a sequential order in each Key Stage, to enable pupils to make connections. We believe that it is essential that we reflect carefully on how the curriculum is planned over time.

Teachers plan collaboratively to enable themselves to be aware of the connections in order to help their pupils towards seeing the relationship between prior learning and new learning or between the concepts being taught in the core and those that are used in the context of learning elsewhere in the core and those that are used in the context of learning elsewhere?

Following the publication of the research into curriculum (HMCI 18/9/2018) we chose the two terms; knowledge and skills. Our shared understanding is that knowledge is facts and information and skills are the application of knowledge in a range of contexts. We adhere to the HMCI comment ‘knowledge underpins and enables the application of skills’, and we understand that both need to be developed alongside one another.

OFSTED Framework January 2019

The quality of education

154. Inspectors will take a rounded view of the quality of education that a school provides to all its pupils, including the most disadvantaged pupils, the most able pupils and pupils with SEND. Inspectors will consider the school’s curriculum, which is the substance of what is taught with a specific plan of what pupils need to know in total, and in each subject.

155. Inspectors will consider the extent to which the school’s curriculum sets out the knowledge and skills that pupils will gain at each stage (intent). They will also consider the way that the curriculum selected by the school is taught and assessed in order to support pupils to build their knowledge and to apply that knowledge as skills (implementation). Finally, inspectors will consider the outcomes that pupils achieve as a result of the education they have received (impact).

26. Inspectors will make a judgement on the quality of education by evaluating the extent to which:

Intent

  • leaders take on or construct a curriculum that is ambitious and designed to give all learners, particularly the most disadvantaged and those with special educational needs and/or disabilities (SEND) or high needs, the knowledge and cultural capital they need to succeed in life.
  • the provider’s curriculum is coherently planned and sequenced towards cumulatively sufficient knowledge and skills for future learning and employment.
  • the provider has the same academic, technical or vocational ambitions for almost all learners. Where this is not practical – for example, for some learners with high levels of SEND – its curriculum is designed to be ambitious and to meet their needs.
  • learners study the full curriculum. Providers ensure this by teaching a full range of subjects for as long as possible, ‘specialising’ only when necessary.

At Glenmere we follow Government statutory guidance through a creative approach in a way that is enjoyable as well as being informative and educational. Our aim is to engage, stimulate and inspire every child by enlivening the content. Educational visits and visitors to school help us to build the character and nature of our curriculum; enabling us to provide real opportunities to reinforce learning, widen horizons, gain and retain knowledge, develop new skills and engage in new experiences.

Following the publication of the research into curriculum (HMCI 18/9/2018) we chose the two terms; knowledge and skills. Our shared understanding is that knowledge is facts and information and skills are the application of knowledge in a range of contexts. We adhere to the HMCI comment ‘knowledge underpins and enables the application of skills’, and we understand that both need to be developed alongside one another.

We aim to provide an inclusive environment for all children in order for them to thrive, enjoy and achieve. We challenge the most able children to grow and develop through stretching their potential in challenging but varied opportunities. For those children who find difficulties in their learning, we encourage, support and look for ways to find the right learning pathway for them.

We have developed our curriculum to ensure that it is broad and balanced and that it is progressive with full coverage. We put our children at the heart of everything we do and provide them with experiences and rich opportunities that they will remember for a lifetime; giving them transferable and valuable skills and attitudes full of purpose and relevant for a society in the 21st century.

The profile has a high profile at Glenmere and we very proud of our achievements in this area. Pupils are introduced to a large multiplicity of competitive tournaments. These allow the children to develop perserverance, competition and endurance. We believe that a strong sporting curriculum gives children valuable learning opportunities and ways to succeed beyond the classroom.

Children from Glenmere have represented Oadby and Wigston at the Leicestershire and Rutland county finals in many sports. WE teach a range of real sports to our children in KS1 and KS2, from basketball, football, hockey, tennis and rugby. Some of these are taught by professional coaches, which has proven to been very successful for both our children and for the CPD of our staff. All of our pupils swim in year 5 and 6 in order to ensure they can all swim 25 metres or more before they leave. We run a variety of whole school sporting events each year and our membership to Learning South Leicester Sports Partnership, enables us to be involved in a variety of area events and also provides fun and engaging activities for children who have SEN, less confident children and less active children. We offer a range of extracurricular sports from cycling, tap dancing, skipping and many traditional sports and these are all available to KS1 and KS2 pupils. We keep the profile of sport raised in our school by providing updates in the newsletter, on Twitter and we have a celebration sports board and provide half termly sports awards for each class. We strongly believe in keeping our children fit and healthy and want to help them meet the NHS recommendations of 60 min activity a day, by giving them all four x 30-minute P.E lessons a week and then all children take part in our fun 15 minutes’ activity as part of our daily boost.

Glenmere also provides extended provision for our children. To promote physical health and wellbeing, a range of clubs are offered and well-received to give children experiences and opportunities during lunch times and before and after school which enhance and enrich the curriculum.

The design of the curriculum ensures that children receive high quality teaching, supported by planned, targeted interventions where needed and are appropriate. This impacts on children’s outcomes in a very positive way. The enjoyment that our curriculum brings to the children promotes achievement, confidence, excellent behaviour and the self-assurance to feel safe when trying new things.

During their seven years at Glenmere the pupils can expect to experience the following visits and visitors to the school.

  • Residential visit in year 6
  • Visits and workshops linked to our topic projects – at least one per term

Launching new topics with trips, visitors or workshops

Culmination of our topics with a showcase of skills and learning to parents in a creative way

Personal growth visits in around the community

Inviting visitors with skills and expertise for our personal growth projects

Regular visitor assemblies often linked to our Power Projects and Personal Growth projects

  • Collaborative visits to local feeder secondary schools, through a variety of curriculum areas.
  • The opportunities to compete in sports tournaments across the year
  • Creative Power Projects – for the whole school termly around one theme
  • STEM activities and science afternoons, working side by side with parents carrying out experiments and investigations
  • Inviting visitors to deliver assemblies including; Religious aspects, authors, poets, British Values, Members of the local community, Health and Safety, NCPCC, Staying Safe, Music, Drama, Science, Sport and many more.
  •  Collaborative visits to local feeder secondary schools, through a variety of curriculum areas.

Implementation

Remember that there is no magic formula for the prefect curriculum – you should always have sound justification for why you are or aren’t doing something, and how this relates to your curriculum intent. Use the following as suggestions for how you might provide a broad and balanced curriculum. Ofsted Framework January 2019

Teachers at Glenmere have good knowledge of the subjects they teach and subject leaders provide effective support to enhance this. The subjects are presented clearly and promote appropriate discussion around the content. Learners’ understanding is checked to identify misconceptions accurately and to provide clear, direct feedback. This supports the way that they adapt their teaching without unnecessarily elaborated or differentiating approaches. The teaching is designed to help learners remember the knowledge and content they have been taught and this is done through recall grids that strengthen prior learning of knowledge, quizzes to support the recall of knowledge and assemblies that build upon prior knowledge and learning. This supports the integration of new knowledge into larger concepts. Teachers and leaders use assessment well to help learners embed and use their knowledge with fluency or to check understanding and inform teaching. Leaders understand the limitations of assessment and they don’t use it in a way that creates any unnecessary burdens for the staff or learners. An environment has been created that allows the learner to focus on learning. The resources that are created reflect the ambitious intentions for the course of study and clearly support the intent of a coherently planned curriculum, sequenced towards the accumulation of sufficient knowledge and skills for future learning. At the early stages of learning to read, reading materials are closely matched to learners’ phonic knowledge.

Impact

From their different starting points, all children will make good progress academically, emotionally, creatively, socially and physically. Knowledge, understanding and skills will be secured and embedded so that children attain highly and are fully prepared for secondary school. They will have strong communication skills, both written and verbal, and will listen respectfully and with tolerance to the views of others. They will take pride in all that they do, always striving to do their best. They will demonstrate emotional resilience and the ability to persevere when they encounter challenge. They will develop a sense of self-awareness and become confident in their own abilities. They will be kind, respectful and honest, demonstrate inclusive attitudes and have a sense of their role in our wider society.

Learners develop detailed knowledge and skills across the curriculum and, as a result, achieve well. Where relevant, this is reflected in results from national tests and examinations which meet government expectations, or in the qualification obtained.

Learners are ready for the next stage of education, employment or training. Where relevant, they gain qualifications that allow them to go on to destinations that meet their interests, aspirations and the intention of their course of study. They read widely and often, with fluency and comprehension.

Ofsted Framework January 2019